Our Primary Investigators Offer Expertise Across Dozens of Fields

If there is one core guiding principle at IBM Research, it’s this: We are better together than we could ever be alone. By housing scientists of many disciplines together, we’ve deliberately created an environment where any given problem can be viewed from many angles. Our researchers aren’t just diverse in their technical expertise, either. They hail from all over the world and possess a broad array of passions, hobbies, and interests. Which is to say, they’re people – people of the highest order. In this space, we’re giving you the opportunity to learn about our them – as scientists, as family members, and most importantly, as fellow human beings.

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Geoffrey Burr

Geoffrey Burr, Ph.D.

Neuromorphic Devices & Architectures
IBM Research - Almaden

Jerry M Chow

Jerry M Chow, Ph.D.

Quantum Computer
IBM Research - Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

Emmanuel Delamarche

Emmanuel Delamarche, Ph.D.

Bioscopes
IBM Research - Zurich

Daniel Friedman

Daniel Friedman, Ph.D.

Future Quantum Leap Project
IBM Research - Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

Jay M Gambetta

Jay M Gambetta, Ph.D.

Quantum Applications
IBM Research - Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

Alberto Valdes Garcia

Alberto Valdes Garcia, Ph.D.

HyperImager
IBM Research - Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

Leo Gross

Leo Gross, Ph.D.

Nanoscopes
IBM Research - Zurich

Hendrik Hamann

Hendrik Hamann, Ph.D.

Macroscopes
IBM Research - Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

David O Melville

David O Melville, Ph.D.

Dataspaces
IBM Research - Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

Bruno Michel

Bruno Michel, Ph.D.

Internet of the Body
IBM Research - Zurich

Jed W Pitera

Jed W Pitera, Ph.D.

Accelerated Materials Discovery
IBM Research - Almaden

Winfried Wilcke

Winfried Wilcke, Ph.D.

Machine Intelligence
IBM Research - Almaden

Robert Wisnieff

Robert Wisnieff, Ph.D.

Future Quantum Leap Project
IBM Research - Thomas J Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights

 

Geoff Burr, Ph.D.

Geoff Burr joined IBM in 1996 after receiving his, Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. He has worked in a number of diverse areas, including holographic data storage, photon echoes, computational electromagnetics, nanophotonics, computational lithography, phase-change memory, storage class memory, and novel access devices based on mixed-ionic-electronic-conduction (MIEC) materials. Geoff and his team are currently working on experimental hardware demonstrations of neural networks based on analog memory devices at a large scale. Geoff took up the clarinet at an early age, and is a passionate player who performs in numerous symphony and chamber music concerts a year for a local community orchestra, while also helping them with marketing and graphic arts. He also serves as a coach in a "VIP" soccer league for kids with mental and physical disabilities.



Jerry M. Chow, Ph.D.

Jerry M. Chow is the Manager of the Experimental Quantum Computing group at IBM. His technical expertise is in the area of design, measurement, and integration of superconducting quantum devices. Chow graduated magna cum laude with a B.A. in physics and M.S. in applied mathematics from Harvard University (2005) and subsequently a Ph.D in physics from Yale University (2010). He was awarded a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for his study at Yale, where he worked on implementing the first quantum processor with superconducting qubits in Professor Rob Schoelkopf’s group. He joined IBM Research as a Research Staff Member in 2010. In 2012 he was recognized in the Forbes 30 under 30 Technology list.



Emmanuel Delamarche, Ph.D.

Emmanuel Delamarche leads activities on experimental biosciences at IBM Research in Zurich, where he became a research staff member in 1998 after earning his, Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Zurich. Emmanuel’s research is focused on personalizing and modernizing healthcare. His current projects deal with investigating intercellular pathways relevant to neurodegenerative diseases. A TEDx speaker, IBM Master Inventor, and winner of the Werner Prize of the Swiss Chemical Society, Emmanuel is one of the most cited scientists in the fields of self-assembly and microfluidics with nearly 9,000 citations. In his free time, Emmanuel loves to read anything, from Gibbon to Frazer, and Nietzsche to Lautreamont. He also enjoys podcasts from The Economist and France Culture.





Jay M. Gambetta, Ph.D.

Jay M. Gambetta is the manager of the Theory of Quantum Computing and Information Group at the T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. He joined IBM in 2011 to work on quantum information science. After earning his, Ph.D. from Griffith University in Australia, he conducted research in quantum information processing with superconducting circuits as a post-doctoral fellow at Yale University and at the Institute for Quantum Computing in Canada. Jay was named a fellow of the American Physical Society in 2014.

Jay believes the full potential of quantum computing is still unknown, but he thinks it reaches beyond our expectations and until we have hardware and a user base this will not be tapped. Quantum computing could lead to the discovery of new pharmaceutical drugs, completely secure cloud computing systems, unlocking new facets of artificial intelligence, developing new materials science to transform industries, searching large volumes of big data and so much more. Outside of the lab, Jay enjoys hiking, snowboarding, and biking.



Alberto Valdes Garcia, Ph.D.

Alberto Valdes Garcia is a research staff member and manager of the RF Circuits and Systems Group at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. He is the winner of numerous awards, including the 2005 Best Doctoral Thesis Award presented by the IEEE Test Technology Technical Council (TTTC), and the 2007 National Youth Award for Outstanding Academic Achievements. Alberto is an industry leader with over 100 authored or co-authored publications, and his scholarly work has received more than 2,000 independent citations. He received his, Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Texas A&M University, and is a Senior Member of IEEE and a member of the IBM Academy of Technology.

At IBM Research, Alberto has been motivated by the opportunities offered by multi-disciplinary collaborations. Some of his recent projects include the world’s first graphene integrated circuit, the first IEEE standard for 60GHz communications, and radio technology for future 5G mobile communications. Alberto is currently working to derive real-time insights about invisible physical phenomena, and to make these insights available to various industries, including security, quality control, and healthcare.



Leo Gross

Leo Gross is a postdoctoral physicist at IBM Research in Zurich. Leo joined IBM after receiving his, Ph.D. in physics from the Free University of Berlin. His work is focused on atomic and molecular manipulation by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), as well as nanostencil lithography. In 2009 he and his coworkers pioneered atomic resolution on molecules by AFM using functionalized tips. Leo is the recipient of the 2012 Feynman Prize for Nanotechnology and the Gerhard Ertl Young Investigator Award in 2010.

Leo is currently working on developing a powerful nanoscope technology that will help gain direct insight of nano-landscapes relevant across industries. The resulting technology will help gain a vantage point into new phenomena and inherent heterogeneity previously not visible, for a deeper understanding on which to build disruptive solutions.



Hendrik Hamann, Ph.D.

Hendrik F. Hamann is a Principal Research Staff Member and Senior Research Manager at the T.J. Watson Research Center. He received his, Ph.D. from the University of Goettingen in Germany, and since joining IBM, has worked on a wide breadth of projects, from the combination of physical models, machine-learning, and big data technologies; internet of things (IoT), sensor-based physical modeling; system physics with applications in renewable energy; and energy management; as well as nanotechnology.

An IBM Master Inventor and a member of the IBM Academy of Technology, Hendrik has authored and co-authored more than 80 peer-reviewed scientific papers, holds over 90 patents, and has over 70 pending patent applications. A career innovator, he was the first to develop a novel, near-field optical microscope to study single molecules at high spatial resolution. He helped IBM win a Vintage Report Innovation Award for the wine industry, by co-developing a prototype irrigation system based on IoT technology. Outside of the lab, Hendrik is an avid long-distance runner, admiring its simplicity and using it as a means to explore nature.



David Melville, Ph.D.

David Melville works on cognitive environments and symbiotic computing at the T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. David joined IBM in 2005 as a research staff member. He began his career in the area of nanotechnology, working on the problem of the 'Perfect Lens', and trying to break the limits of imaging with light for the benefit of semi-conductor fabrication. He holds a, Ph.D. in electrical and electronics engineering from the University of Canterbury in his native New Zealand.

David has since turned his attention to big-data visualization, cognitive computing, and immersive environments. His research interests include immersive dataspaces, spatial computing, adaptive physical architecture, and symbiotic experience design. He has also worked on smart grids in the energy industry, applying analytics to construct infrastructure models to predict the effects of unexpected forces like inclement weather or spikes in demand.



Bruno Michel, Ph.D.

Bruno Michel works on advanced micro integration at IBM Research – Zurich. He received a, Ph.D. in biochemistry and biophysics from the University of Zurich, and joined the Zurich lab in 1988, inspired by Nobel Prize winner Heinrich Rohrer and his work on scanning tunneling microscope. His early work focused on scanning probe microscopy and its applications to molecules and thin organic films. He introduced microcontact printing, and led a project for the development of large-area soft lithography for LCD displays.

Bruno’s current research focuses on developing new a generation of wearables as cognitive companions for humans. He believes the large array of on-body data, once decoded, will yield new possibilities for environmental sensing, cooperative interaction, complex navigation, augmented awareness, and better health. Outside of his research, Bruno is an avid tap dancer, and enjoys hiking and snowboarding in the Swiss Alps – proving him a firsthand look at glacier shrinking due to global warming.



Jed Pitera, Ph.D.

Jed Pitera manages the Materials Discovery group at IBM Research Almaden. He joined IBM Research in 2001, and has worked since then to apply computational tools to challenging condensed matter problems, from surfactants to biomolecules to block co-polymers. His team is engaged in developing polymeric materials for lithography, recycling, sensors, and drug delivery. Jed received his, Ph.D. in Biophysics from the University of California, San Francisco, where he is an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry.

Jed’s current research focuses on the use of theory and computer simulation to address questions in chemistry and materials science, particularly in the areas of molecular recognition, self-assembly, and computer-aided materials design. A key area of interest is the use of cognitive systems like Watson to accelerate the discovery and development of new materials and processes.



Winfried Wilcke, Ph.D.

Winfried Wilcke is the Senior Manager for Nanoscale Science and Technology, and a Distinguished Research Staff Member at IBM Research – Almaden. After earning a, Ph.D. in experimental nuclear physics in his native Germany, Winfried joined IBM Research in 1983, and has since lead numerous successful projects, including the research leading to the IBM SP series of large supercomputers and IBM IceCube. During the nineties, he served as CTO of HAL Computer.

His recent research is focused on cognitive computing and advanced energy storage, which he believes will be critical for the renewable energy economy and led to the launch of the IBM Battery 500 project. In the cognitive space, he initiated a new project on machine intelligence – going beyond traditional machine learning – with the goal of building machines that autonomously make and act on predictions from sensory data. Outside of the lab, Winfried enjoys flying his collection of airplanes, sailing, and diving. He is a passionate writer, and the author of the 2008 collection of stories titled Random Walk.