AI and Cognitive Computing

Explore the future of AI with IBM Research

 

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AI research @ IBM

Humans are on the cusp of augmenting their lives in extraordinary ways with AI. At IBM Research Labs around the globe, we envision and develop next-generation systems that work side-by side with humans, accelerating our ability to create, learn, make decisions and think. We also architect the future of Watson, which has evolved from an IBM Research project to the world’s first and most-advanced AI platform. Whether exploring new technical capabilities, collaborating on ethical practices or applying Watson technology to cancer research, financial decision-making, oil exploration or educational toys, IBM Research is shaping the future of AI.

AI for cancer detection

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AI for cancer detection

In any given day, radiologists can review thousands of images to make health diagnoses. To make critical decisions, they typically piece together multiple sources of clinical information visually and manually, including electronic health records, research publications and other data. To address this, IBM researchers have harnessed the cognitive computing power of IBM Watson to analyze large amounts of imaging and text in electronic health records. In a new demo developed in collaboration with the Radiological Society, radiologist can select a sample patient case and see how a Watson-powered prototype surfaces insights from the case as it understands, reasons and learns from text and imaging data in real time.

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IBM TrueNorth Neurosynaptic System

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IBM TrueNorth Neurosynaptic System

IBM researchers -- led by Dharmendra S. Modha, R&D Magazine’s 2016 Scientist of the Year -- developed a chip with the potential to integrate brain-like capability into mobile devices. This revolutionary new design is the culmination of over a decade of research by IBM. It can be used in many fields including public safety, vision assistance for the blind, home health monitoring and transportation.

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First movie trailer created by AI

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IBM Research Takes Watson to Hollywood

Sixty-five percent of movie-goers watch trailers on YouTube to help them pick a movie. 20th Century Fox turned to IBM Research to help make a new trailer for its film, "Morgan." Using experimental Watson APIs, the team analyzed visuals, audio and composition from 100 horror movie trailers to select the best moments for the first A.I.-generated movie trailer.

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Brain-inspired AI supercomputing system

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U.S. Air Force Research Lab Taps IBM to Build Brain-Inspired AI Supercomputing System

ai with the airforce

IBM Research and the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) today announced they are collaborating on a first-of-a-kind brain-inspired supercomputing system powered by a 64-chip array of the IBM TrueNorth Neurosynaptic System. The scalable platform IBM is building for AFRL will feature an end-to-end software ecosystem designed to enable deep neural-network learning and information discovery. The system’s advanced pattern recognition and sensory processing power will be the equivalent of 64 million neurons and 16 billion synapses, while the processor component will consume the energy equivalent of a dim light bulb – a mere 10 watts to power.

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Cognitive assistant for the visually impaired

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Cognitive assistant for the visually impaired

IBM is making the real world more accessible for the visually challenged with a “cognitive assistant” to help them “see” and interact more fully with their surroundings.. Together with Carnegie Mellon University, IBM researchers open sourced a platform to help researchers and developers invent new technologies to create engaging experiences for the visually impaired..

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Creating a window into mental health

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With AI, our words will be a window into our mental health

Cognitive computers will analyze a patient’s speech or written words to look for tell-tale indicators found in language, including meaning, syntax and intonation. Combining the results of these measurements with those from wearables devices and imaging systems (MRIs and EEGs) can paint a more complete picture of the individual for health professionals to better identify, understand and treat the underlying disease, be it Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s disease, PTSD or even neurodevelopmental conditions such as autism and ADHD.

At IBM, scientists are using transcripts and audio inputs from psychiatric interviews, coupled with machine learning techniques, to find patterns in speech to help clinicians accurately predict and monitor psychosis, schizophrenia, mania and depression. Today, it only takes about 300 words to help clinicians predict the probability of psychosis in a user.

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AI and machine learning aid schizophrenia research

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AI and machine learning aid schizophrenia research

Earlier this year, IBM scientists collaborated with researchers at the University of Alberta and the IBM Alberta Centre for Advanced Studies (CAS) to publish new research regarding the use of AI and machine learning algorithms to predict instances of schizophrenia with 74 percent accuracy. The research also shows a further capability to predict the severity of specific symptoms in schizophrenia patients – something that was not possible before. Using AI and machine learning, ‘computational psychiatry’ can be used to help clinicians more quickly assess – and therefore treat – patients with schizophrenia.

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Cognitive environments lab

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Inspired by the IBM Cognitive Environments Lab

IBM Research scientist and designer Maryam Ashoori demonstrates how a cognitive room can inspire us -- and even improve our mood. The IBM Research Cognitive Environments Lab can hear, talk to and see its occupants. And occupants can communicate back to the room to conduct research and make strategic decisions.

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